Fairtrade's human rights commitment

Legislation is needed – voluntary initiatives like certifications are not sufficient to solve human rights violations in global supply chains. But ambitious certifications like Fairtrade can offer invaluable support to Human Rights and Environmental Due Diligence work by companies, workers and farmers. Learn more about our work below

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    How Does Fairtrade mitigate human rights violations in global supply chains?

    Whether it is by strengthening our own processes, calling for mandatory human rights legislation, or supporting farmers and workers, here is an overview of what we do.

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    Building supply chain collaboration to strive towards living incomes

    Farmers earning a decent living is a clear enough goal. Yet collaboration across all stakeholders is needed to drive progress forward.

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    The vital role of trade unions


    It is critical for workers to join voices in trade unions and collectively negotiate. Their conditions should not solely rely on private standard setters.

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    Remediating child labour: lessons learnt from belizean sugar cane producers

    A deeper understanding and commitment to addressing child labour risks is needed, it is not an isolated issue to be dealt with, and access to remedy by the rights holders is critical.

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the journey is just beginning

To have a positive impact on farmers and workers, HREDD legislation should ensure real shifts in business practices. It is an ongoing journey for us, and all actors involved. Read our commitment, why access to remedy is critical, and much more.

We were taught to serve, to be workers. Now with Fairtrade, we are entrepreneurs.Martial Quintero, banana producer, Cooperativa de Servicios Multiples Bananera del Atlantico, Panama

Image of Fairtrade bananas